Whose Book Is it Anyway? A View from Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity - cover image

Copyright

Janis Jefferies; Sarah Kember

Published On

2019-03-12

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-648-4
Hardback978-1-78374-649-1
PDF978-1-78374-650-7
HTML978-1-80064-577-6
XML978-1-78374-653-8
EPUB978-1-78374-651-4
MOBI978-1-78374-652-1

Language

  • English

Print Length

458 pages (xiv+444)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 32 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.25" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 35 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.38" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback1903g (67.13oz)
Hardback2306g (81.34oz)

Media

Illustrations21
Tables3

OCLC Number

1099535636

LCCN

2019452861

BIC

  • LNR
  • LNRC
  • KNTP

BISAC

  • LAW050010
  • LAN027000

LCC

  • Z551

Keywords

  • collection of essays
  • copyright
  • copyright debate
  • open access
  • ethics
  • creativity
  • artist’s perspectives
  • writer’s perspectives
  • feminist perspectives
  • international perspectives
  • future of publishing
  • intellectual property
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Whose Book Is it Anyway?

A View from Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity

  • Janis Jefferies (editor)
  • Sarah Kember (editor)

Whose Book is it Anyway? is a provocative collection of essays that opens out the copyright debate to questions of open access, ethics, and creativity. It includes views – such as artist’s perspectives, writer’s perspectives, feminist, and international perspectives – that are too often marginalized or elided altogether. The diverse range of contributors take various approaches, from the scholarly and the essayistic to the graphic, to explore the future of publishing based on their experiences as publishers, artists, writers and academics. Considering issues such as intellectual property, copyright and comics, digital publishing and remixing, and what it means (not) to say one is an author, these vibrant essays urge us to view central aspects of writing and publishing in a new light. Whose Book is it Anyway? is a timely and varied collection of essays. It asks us to reconceive our understanding of publishing, copyright and open access, and it is essential reading for anyone invested in the future of publishing.

Table of Contents

Notes on Contributors

Introduction: Whose Book is it Anyway? A View from Elsewhere on Publishing, Copyright and Creativity

Janis Jefferies and Sarah Kember


PART I: Opening out the Copyright Debate: Open Access, Ethics and Creativity

A Statement by The Readers Project Concerning Contemporary Literary Practice, Digital Mediation, Intellectual Property, and Associated Moral Rights

John Cayley and Daniel C. Howe

London-Havana Diary: Art Publishing, Sustainability, Free Speech and Free Papers

Louise O’Hare

The Ethics of Emergent Creativity: Can We Move Beyond Writing as Human Enterprise, Commodity and Innovation?

Janneke Adema

Are Publishers Worth It? Filtering, Amplification and the Value of Publishing

Michael Bhaskar

Who Takes Legal Responsibility for Published Work? Why Both an Understanding and Lived Experience of Copyright Are Becoming Increasingly Important to Writers

Alison Baverstock

Telling Stories or Selling Stories: Writing for Pleasure, Writing for Art or Writing to Get Paid?

Sophie Rochester

Copyright in the Everyday Practice of Writers

Smita Kheria

Comics, Copyright and Academic Publishing: The Deluxe Edition

Ronan Deazley and Jason Mathis

PART II: Views from Elsewhere

Diversity or die: How the Face of Book Publishing Needs to Change if it is to Have a Future

Danuta Kean

10. Writing on the Cusp of Becoming Something Else

J. R. Carpenter

Confronting Authorship, Constructing Practices (How Copyright is Destroying Collective Practice)

Eva Weinmayr

Ethical Scholarly Publishing Practices, Copyright and Open Access: A View from Ethnomusicology and Anthropology

Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg

Show me the Copy! How Digital Media (Re)Assert Relational Creativity, Complicating Existing Intellectual Property and Publishing Paradigms

Joseph F. Turcotte

Redefining Reader and Writer, Remixing Copyright: Experimental Publishing at if:book Australia

Simon Groth

APPENDIX: CREATe Position Papers

Publishing Industry

Janis Jefferies

Is the Current Copyright Framework fit for Purpose in Relation to Writing, Reading and Publishing in the Digital Age?

Laurence Kaye

Is the Current Copyright Framework fit for Purpose in Relation to Writing, Reading, and Publishing in the Digital Age?

Richard Mollet

History of Copyright Changes 1710–2013

Rachel Calder

Is the Current Copyright Framework fit for Purpose in Relation to Writing, Reading, and Publishing in the Digital Age?

Max Whitby

List of Illustrations


Index

Contributors

Janis Jefferies

(editor)
Professor Emerita of Visual Arts at Goldsmiths University of London

Sarah Kember

(editor)
Professor of New Technologies of Communication at Goldsmiths University of London