Who Saved the Parthenon?: A New History of the Acropolis Before, During and After the Greek Revolution - cover image

Copyright

William St Clair

Published On

2022-05-26

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-461-9
Hardback978-1-78374-462-6
PDF978-1-78374-463-3
HTML978-1-80064-555-4
XML978-1-80064-299-7
EPUB978-1-78374-464-0
AZW3978-1-78374-465-7

Language

  • English

Print Length

896 pages (xviii+878)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 61 x 234 mm(6.14" x 2.4" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 47 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.85" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback1660g (58.55oz)
Hardback1417g (49.98oz)

Media

Illustrations191

OCLC Number

1099628716

LCCN

2021392553

BIC

  • HBLL
  • 1DVG
  • 1QDT

BISAC

  • ARC005020
  • HIS042000

LCC

  • DF287.P3

Keywords

  • History of the Parthenon
  • From the modern era to the present day
  • Cultural icon
  • National identity
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Who Saved the Parthenon?

A New History of the Acropolis Before, During and After the Greek Revolution

In this magisterial book, William St Clair unfolds the history of the Parthenon throughout the modern era to the present day, with special emphasis on the period before, during, and after the Greek War of Independence of 1821–32. Focusing particularly on the question of who saved the Parthenon from destruction during this conflict, with the help of documents that shed a new light on this enduring question, he explores the contributions made by the Philhellenes, Ancient Athenians, Ottomans and the Great Powers.

Marshalling a vast amount of primary evidence, much of it previously unexamined and published here for the first time, St Clair rigorously explores the multiple ways in which the Parthenon has served both as a cultural icon onto which meanings are projected and as a symbol of particular national, religious and racial identities, as well as how it illuminates larger questions about the uses of built heritage. This book has a companion volume with the classical Parthenon as its main focus, which offers new ways of recovering the monument and its meanings in ancient times.

St Clair builds on the success of his classic text, The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period, to present this rich and authoritative account of the Parthenon’s presentation and reception throughout history. With weighty implications for the present life of the Parthenon, it is itself a monumental contribution to accounts of the Greek Revolution, to classical studies, and to intellectual history.

Contents

Preface

(pp. xiii–xvi)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.32

1. Why Another Book?

(pp. 1–20)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.01

2. The Place

(pp. 21–64)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.02

3. The People

(pp. 65–80)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.03

4. The Encounter

(pp. 81–140)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.04

5. Communities, Real and Imagined

(pp. 141–150)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.05

6. The Evidence

(pp. 151–180)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.06

7. The New Science and its Enemies

(pp. 181–212)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.07

8. Towards a Practical Theory of History

(pp. 213–236)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.08

9. Romanticism and its Rhetorics

(pp. 237–250)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.09

10. The Choices

(pp. 251–276)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.10

11. The Siege of 1826 and 1827

(pp. 277–286)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.11

12. The Surrender

(pp. 287–304)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.12

13. The Last Days of Ottoman Athens

(pp. 305–314)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.13

14. The Living

(pp. 315–336)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.14

15. The Dead

(pp. 337–358)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.15

16. ‘The World had need of them’

(pp. 359–378)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.16

17. The Secret

(pp. 379–392)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.17

18. The Bargain

(pp. 393–410)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.18

19. The Silence

(pp. 411–426)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.19

20. The Stories

(pp. 427–436)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.20

21. Which Pasts, which Futures?

(pp. 437–512)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.21

22. Still a Dark Heritage

(pp. 513–584)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.22

23. Whose Parthenon?

(pp. 585–624)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.23

24. The Parthenon in our Time

(pp. 625–654)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.24

25. Heritage

(pp. 655–660)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.25

Appendix A: The Firman Obtained by Lord Elgin in 1801 and Related Documents

(pp. 661–678)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.26

Appendix B: The Firman of 1821

(pp. 679–684)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.27

Appendix C: The Intercepted Letters of the Ottoman Military Commander (‘Seraskier’) Reşid Mehmed Pasha, Often Known as Kiutahi or Reschid

(pp. 685–690)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.28

Appendix D: The Firman of 1826 and Other Primary Documents Relating to the Preservation of the Ancient Monuments of Athens Issued by the Ottoman Government

(pp. 691–706)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.29

Appendix E: Primary Contemporary Documents Recording the Views of those Who Opposed the Greek Revolution

(pp. 707–730)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.30

Appendix F: Four Local Descriptions of Athens from the Long Millennium

(pp. 731–740)
  • William St Clair
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0136.31

Contributors

William St Clair

(author)

(7 December 1937 – 30 June 2021) was a British historian, senior research fellow at the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

David St Clair

(editor)
Emeritus Professor at Aberdeen University