Arab Media Systems - cover image

Book Series

Copyright

Carola Richter; Claudia Kozman

Published On

2021-03-03

ISBN

Paperback978-1-80064-059-7
Hardback978-1-80064-060-3
PDF978-1-80064-061-0
HTML978-1-80064-639-1
XML978-1-80064-064-1
EPUB978-1-80064-062-7
MOBI978-1-80064-063-4

Language

  • English

Print Length

416 pages (xliv+372)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 29 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.14" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 32 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.25" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback1733g (61.13oz)
Hardback2132g (75.20oz)

Media

Illustrations6
Tables1

OCLC Number

1240827479

LCCN

2020447285

BIC

  • 1FB
  • JFD
  • J
  • KNTJ

BISAC

  • LAN008000
  • SOC052000
  • HIS003000

LCC

  • P92.A65

Keywords

  • media systems
  • Arab world
  • history
  • politics
  • society
  • economy
  • media
  • Middle East
  • North Africa
  • government
  • technology
  • media ownership models
  • transnational mobility
  • law
  • ownership patterns
  • infrastructure
  • diversity
  • religion
  • languages
  • overview
  • journalism
  • communication studies
  • political science
  • sociology
  • anthropology
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Arab Media Systems

This volume provides a comparative analysis of media systems in the Arab world, based on criteria informed by the historical, political, social, and economic factors influencing a country’s media. Reaching beyond classical western media system typologies, 'Arab Media Systems' brings together contributions from experts in the field of media in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to provide valuable insights into the heterogeneity of this region’s media systems. It focuses on trends in government stances towards media, media ownership models, technological innovation, and the role of transnational mobility in shaping media structure and practices.

Each chapter in the volume traces a specific country’s media – from Lebanon to Morocco – and assesses its media system in terms of historical roots, political and legal frameworks, media economy and ownership patterns, technology and infrastructure, and social factors (including diversity and equality in gender, age, ethnicities, religions, and languages).

This book is a welcome contribution to the field of media studies, constituting the only edited collection in recent years to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of Arab media systems. As such, it will be of great use to students and scholars in media, journalism and communication studies, as well as political scientists, sociologists, and anthropologists with an interest in the MENA region.

This volume provides a comparative analysis of media systems in the Arab world, based on criteria informed by the historical, political, social, and economic factors influencing a country’s media. Reaching beyond classical western media system typologies, Arab Media Systems brings together contributions from experts in the field of media in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to provide valuable insights into the heterogeneity of this region’s media systems. It focuses on trends in government stances towards media, media ownership models, technological innovation, and the role of transnational mobility in shaping media structure and practices.


Each chapter in the volume traces a specific country’s media – from Lebanon to Morocco – and assesses its media system in terms of historical roots, political and legal frameworks, media economy and ownership patterns, technology and infrastructure, and social factors (including diversity and equality in gender, age, ethnicities, religions, and languages).

This book is a welcome contribution to the field of media studies, constituting the only edited collection in recent years to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of Arab media systems. As such, it will be of great use to students and scholars in media, journalism and communication studies, as well as political scientists, sociologists, and anthropologists with an interest in the MENA region.

This volume provides a comparative analysis of media systems in the Arab world, based on criteria informed by the historical, political, social, and economic factors influencing a country’s media. Reaching beyond classical western media system typologies, Arab Media Systems brings together contributions from experts in the field of media in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to provide valuable insights into the heterogeneity of this region’s media systems. It focuses on trends in government stances towards media, media ownership models, technological innovation, and the role of transnational mobility in shaping media structure and practices.

Each chapter in the volume traces a specific country’s media – from Lebanon to Morocco – and assesses its media system in terms of historical roots, political and legal frameworks, media economy and ownership patterns, technology and infrastructure, and social factors (including diversity and equality in gender, age, ethnicities, religions, and languages).

This book is a welcome contribution to the field of media studies, constituting the only edited collection in recent years to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of Arab media systems. As such, it will be of great use to students and scholars in media, journalism and communication studies, as well as political scientists, sociologists, and anthropologists with an interest in the MENA region.

Reviews

The editors offer a thorough introduction examining recent media developments alongside the historical, political, and economic transformations that have shaped the region [...] The volume adds to recent debates in media and communication studies while providing useful empirical data on the complex political and media environments of the Arab world.

J. Alkorani

CHOICE connect, vol. 60, no. 2, 2022.

Contents

1. Lebanon: A Faltering Mesh of Political and Commercial Interests

(pp. 1–18)
  • Sarah El-Richani
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.01

2. Syria: A Fragmented Media System

(pp. 19–36)
  • Yazan Badran
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.02

3. Palestine: Resilient Media Practices for National Liberation

(pp. 37–54)
  • Gretchen King
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.03

4. Jordan: Media’s Sustainability during Hard Times

(pp. 55–72)
  • Basim Tweissi
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.04

5. Iraq: Media between Democratic Freedom and Security Pressures

(pp. 73–90)
  • Sahar Khalifa Salim
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.05

6. Saudi Arabia: From National Media to Global Player

(pp. 91–108)
  • Marwan M. Kraidy
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.06

7. United Arab Emirates: Media for Sustainable Development

(pp. 109–126)
  • Mohammad Ayish
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.07

8. Qatar: A Small Country with a Global Outlook

(pp. 127–144)
  • Ehab Galal
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.08

9. Bahrain: Media-Assisted Authoritarianism

(pp. 145–162)
  • Marc Owen Jones
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.09

10. Kuwait: From "Hollywood of the Gulf" to Social Media Diwaniyas

(pp. 163–180)
  • Fatima Alsalem
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.10

11. Oman: Time for Fundamental Changes

(pp. 181–196)
  • Abdullah K. Al-Kindi
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.11

12. Yemen: Unsettled Media for an Unsettled Country

(pp. 197–214)
  • Abdulrahman M. Al-Shami
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.12

13. Egypt: A Divided and Restricted Media Landscape after the Transformation

(pp. 215–232)
  • Hanan Badr
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.13

14. Sudan: Media under the Military–Democratic Pendulum

(pp. 233–248)
  • Mahmoud M. Galander
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.14

15. Libya: From Jamahirization to Post-Revolutionary Chaos

(pp. 249–266)
  • Carola Richter
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.15

16. Tunisia: The Transformative Media Landscape after the Revolution

(pp. 267–284)
  • Noureddine Miladi
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.16

17. Algeria: The Costs of Clientelism

(pp. 285–302)
  • Nacer-Eddine Layadi
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.17

18. Morocco: Competitive Authoritarianism in Media Reforms

(pp. 303–322)
  • Bouziane Zaid
  • Mohammed Ibahrine
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.18

Conclusion

(pp. 323–342)
  • Carola Richter
  • Claudia Kozman
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.19

Introduction

(pp. xi–xliv)
  • Carola Richter
  • Claudia Kozman
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0238.20

Contributors

Carola Richter

(editor)
Professor of International Communication at Freie Universität Berlin

Claudia Kozman

(editor)
Assistant Professor of Multimedia Journalism and the Research Director at the Institute of Media Research and Training at Lebanese American University