Waltzing Through Europe: Attitudes towards Couple Dances in the Long Nineteenth Century - cover image

Copyright

Egil Bakka; Theresa Jill Buckland; Helena Saarikoski; Anne von Bibra Wharton

Published On

2020-09-10

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-732-0
Hardback978-1-78374-733-7
PDF978-1-78374-734-4
HTML978-1-80064-588-2
XML978-1-78374-737-5
EPUB978-1-78374-735-1
MOBI978-1-78374-736-8

Language

  • English

Print Length

494 pages (x+484)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 34 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.35" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 38 x 234 mm(6.14" x 1.5" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback2049g (72.28oz)
Hardback2456g (86.63oz)

Media

Illustrations144

OCLC Number

1197556636

LCCN

2019394530

BIC

  • ASD
  • HBTB
  • 1D
  • 3J

BISAC

  • MUS011000
  • HIS054000

LCC

  • GV1761

Keywords

  • dance studies
  • historiography
  • cultural memory
  • folklore
  • dance
  • Waltz
  • Polka
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Waltzing Through Europe

Attitudes towards Couple Dances in the Long Nineteenth Century

From ‘folk devils’ to ballroom dancers, Waltzing Through Europe explores the changing reception of fashionable couple dances in Europe from the eighteenth century onwards.

A refreshing intervention in dance studies, this book brings together elements of historiography, cultural memory, folklore, and dance across comparatively narrow but markedly heterogeneous localities. Rooted in investigations of often newly discovered primary sources, the essays afford many opportunities to compare sociocultural and political reactions to the arrival and practice of popular rotating couple dances, such as the Waltz and the Polka. Leading contributors provide a transnational and affective lens onto strikingly diverse topics, ranging from the evolution of romantic couple dances in Croatia, and Strauss’s visits to Hamburg and Altona in the 1830s, to dance as a tool of cultural preservation and expression in twentieth-century Finland.

Waltzing Through Europe creates openings for fresh collaborations in dance historiography and cultural history across fields and genres. It is essential reading for researchers of dance in central and northern Europe, while also appealing to the general reader who wants to learn more about the vibrant histories of these familiar dance forms.

Reviews

All the chapters are in English, and as such the authors are able to introduce hitherto limited-access research materials in their own languages to a wider, international audience. An excellent feature of the book is the extensive use of references to online video material, including the use of QR codes to make access easier. At a time when academic book prices have become excessive, it is pleasing to note that this book is available as a free PDF online, as well as for purchase at a reasonable price. This excellent collection should appeal to anyone with an interest in popular and traditional dance and its international transmission.

Derek Schofield

Folk Music Journal, vol. 12, no. 2,

Contents

1. The Round Dance Paradigm

(pp. 1–26)
  • Egil Bakka
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.01

2. The State of Research

(pp. 27–52)
  • Egil Bakka
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.02

3. A Survey of the Chapters in the Book

(pp. 53–62)
  • Egil Bakka
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.03

4. The Waltz at Some Central European Courts

(pp. 63–106)
  • Egil Bakka
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.04

5. The Polka as a Czech National Symbol

(pp. 107–148)
  • Daniela Stavělová
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.05

6. Decency, Health, and Grace Endangered by Quick Dancing? The New Dance Style in Bohemia in 1830

(pp. 149–176)
  • Dorota Gremlicová
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.06

7. Reception of Nineteenth-Century Couple Dances in Hungary

(pp. 177–238)
  • László Felföldi
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.07

8. The Waltz among Slovenians

(pp. 239–256)
  • Rebeka Kunej
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.08

9. Dancing and Politics in Croatia: The Salonsko Kolo as a Patriotic Response to the Waltz

(pp. 257–282)
  • Ivana Katarinčić
  • Iva Niemčić
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.09

10. Waltzing Through Europe: Johann Strauss (the Elder) in Hamburg and Altona in 1836

(pp. 283–316)
  • Jörgen Torp
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.10

11. Continuity and Reinvention: Past Round Dances in Present Estonia

(pp. 317–342)
  • Sille Kapper
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.11

12. The Ban on Round Dances 1917–1957: Regulating Social Dancing in Norwegian Community Houses

(pp. 343–374)
  • Egil Bakka
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.12

13. Dance and ‘Folk Devils’

(pp. 375–394)
  • Mats Nilsson
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.13

14. Nostalgia as a Perspective on Past Dance Culture in Finland

(pp. 395–416)
  • Helena Saarikoski
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.14

15. A Twenty-First Century Resurrection: The Potresujka, the Croatian Polka Tremblante

(pp. 417–432)
  • Tvrtko Zebec
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0174.15

Contributors

Egil Bakka

(editor)
Professor Emeritus of Dance Studies at Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Theresa Jill Buckland

(editor)
Professor of Dance History and Ethnography, Department of Dance at University of Roehampton

Helena Saarikoski

(editor)
Adjunct Professor of Folklore and Women’s Studies at University of Helsinki

Anne von Bibra Wharton

(editor)
Ballroom and World Dance Traditions in the Dance Department at St. Olaf College