Sailing from Polis to Empire: Ships in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Hellenistic Period - cover image

Copyright

Emmanuel Nantet; Copyright of individual chapters is maintained by the chapters’ authors.

Published On

2020-07-22

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-693-4
Hardback978-1-78374-694-1
PDF978-1-78374-695-8
HTML978-1-80064-582-0
XML978-1-78374-698-9
EPUB978-1-78374-696-5
MOBI978-1-78374-697-2

Language

  • English

Print Length

138 pages (xviii+130)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 10 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.41" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 14 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.56" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback648g (22.86oz)
Hardback1027g (36.23oz)

Media

Illustrations48
Tables5

OCLC Number

1182808058

LCCN

2020445909

BIC

  • HBJD
  • HBLA
  • HBTM

BISAC

  • HIS002010

LCC

  • VM16
  • S25

Keywords

  • Hellenistic archaeology
  • Hellenistic economy
  • naval architecture
  • shipping in the eastern Mediterranean
  • maritime trade
  • the Mediterranean
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Sailing from Polis to Empire

Ships in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Hellenistic Period

This book represents a significant contribution to the fields of Hellenistic archaeology, Hellenistic economy, naval architecture and shipping in the eastern Mediterranean. It asks (and answers) questions that are often simply assumed and not systematically investigated.
— Dr. Conor Trainor, University of Warwick

What can the architecture of ancient ships tell us about their capacity to carry cargo or to navigate certain trade routes? How do such insights inform our knowledge of the ancient economies that depended on maritime trade across the Mediterranean?

These and similar questions lie behind Sailing from Polis to Empire, a fascinating insight into the practicalities of trading by boat in the ancient world. Allying modern scientific knowledge with Hellenistic sources, this interdisciplinary collection brings together experts in various fields of ship archaeology to shed new light on the role played by ships and sailing in the exchange networks of the Mediterranean. Covering all parts of the Eastern Mediterranean, these outstanding contributions delve into a broad array of data – literary, epigraphical, papyrological, iconographic and archaeological – to understand the trade routes that connected the economies of individual cities and kingdoms.

Unique in its interdisciplinary approach and focus on the Hellenistic period, this collection digs into the questions that others don’t think to ask, and comes up with (sometimes surprising) answers. It will be of value to researchers in the fields of naval architecture, Classical and Hellenistic history, social history and ancient geography, and to all those with an interest in the ancient world or the seafaring life.

Endorsements

This book represents a significant contribution to the fields of Hellenistic archaeology, Hellenistic economy, naval architecture and shipping in the eastern Mediterranean. It asks (and answers) questions that are often simply assumed and not systematically investigated.

Dr. Conor Trainor

University of Warwick

Reviews

This work is a worthy and innovative contribution to its field. The visual component is a valuable asset towards the understanding of the subject, and the inclusion of different themes, explored through varied approaches, allows for a greater understanding of the most recent work in nautical studies of the ancient Mediterranean, bringing important input into a subject that has been growing in visibility during the past few years, due to new technologies and the irreplaceable role of underwater archaeological surveys. The bibliographies of the different chapters provide a valuable collection of both early ship studies, updated and very recent publications, and ancient sources, in which researchers can find passages for further consideration. The illustration list, which includes ancient iconography, also contributes to this purpose. Even though the nature of the various chapters seems, at first, rather different, readers will soon realise that they are connected by the same approach and purpose, marking the work’s methodological position and serving as a practical guide to researchers who may wish to further their knowledge and future investigation into these matters. Its proposed timeframe, albeit focusing on the Hellenistic era, often ends up transposing towards the more remote period of the Homeric tales and occasionally extends into the Roman imperial period, especially as regards iconographic surveys, due to the scarcity of material. This allows the work to go beyond its initial scope and to consider matters such as technological capacities, shipbuilding techniques, harbour characteristics and mental and socio-economical influence of ship trade with a long-term view, another mark of its multidisciplinary approach.

Daniela Dantas, Centre for History of the University of Lisbon

"SHIPS, POLIS AND EMPIRE". The Classical Review (1464-3561), vol. 71, no. 1, 2021. doi:10.1017/S0009840X21000202

Full Review

Table of Contents

Preliminary Notes

Authors


Preface

Alain Bresson


1. The Hellenistic Merchantmen: A Contribution to the Study of the Mediterranean Economies

Emmanuel Nantet


2. Evolutions of the Representation of the Eastern Mediterranean in the Hellenistic Period

Jean-Marie Kowalski


3. Naval Architecture. The Hellenistic Hull Design: Origin and Evolution

Patrice Pomey


4. Naves Pingere: 'Painting Ships' in the Hellenistic Period

Martin Galinier and Emmanuel Nantet


5. The Rise of the Tonnage in the Hellenistic Period

Emmanuel Nantet


6. A Note on the Navigation Space of the Baris-Type Ships from Thonis-Heracleion

Alexander Belov


Bibliography

List of Tables and Illustrations

Index


Contributors

Emmanuel Nantet

(editor)
Lecturer in the Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies at University of Haifa