Warlike and Peaceful Societies: The Interaction of Genes and Culture - cover image

Copyright

Agner Fog

Published On

2017-10-16

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-403-9
Hardback978-1-78374-404-6
PDF978-1-78374-405-3
HTML978-1-80064-547-9
XML978-1-78374-427-5
EPUB978-1-78374-406-0
MOBI978-1-78374-407-7

Language

  • English

Print Length

364 pages (viii + 356)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 19 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.76" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 21 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.81" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback1133g (39.97oz)
Hardback1519g (53.58oz)

Media

Illustrations33
Tables18

OCLC Number

1009529083

LCCN

2017393781

BIC

  • JMH
  • GTJ
  • JWA
  • JHM
  • HPS

BISAC

  • PSY031000
  • POL010000
  • SOC026040
  • PSY053000
  • POL012000

LCC

  • HM626
  • F64

Keywords

  • sociology
  • collective psychology
  • evolutionary psychology
  • regality theory
  • anthropology
  • ecology
  • conflict
  • security
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Warlike and Peaceful Societies

The Interaction of Genes and Culture

Are humans violent or peaceful by nature? We are both.
In this ambitious and wide-ranging book, Agner Fog presents a ground-breaking new argument that explains the existence of differently organised societies using evolutionary theory. It combines natural sciences and social sciences in a way that is rarely seen.
According to a concept called regality theory, people show a preference for authoritarianism and strong leadership in times of war or collective danger, but desire egalitarian political systems in times of peace and safety. These individual impulses shape the way societies develop and organise themselves, and in this book Agner argues that there is an evolutionary mechanism behind this flexible psychology. Incorporating a wide range of ideas including evolutionary theory, game theory, and ecological theory, Agner analyses the conditions that make us either strident or docile. He tests this theory on data from contemporary and ancient societies, and provides a detailed explanation of the applications of regality theory to issues of war and peace, the rise and fall of empires, the mass media, economic instability, ecological crisis, and much more.
Warlike and Peaceful Societies: The Interaction of Genes and Culture draws on many different fields of both the social sciences and the natural sciences. It will be of interest to academics and students in these fields, including anthropology, political science, history, conflict and peace research, social psychology, and more, as well as the natural sciences, including human biology, human evolution, and ecology.

Reviews

[...] it presents a valuable overview of the extensive literature on the societal correlates of modern warfare and makes a convincing, and timely, case for the deceptive use of the threat of war by populists or budding dictators.

Carel P. van Schaik, University of Zurich

"What’s war got to do with it?". Adaptive Behaviour (1059-7123), vol. 26, no. 4, 2018. doi:10.1177/1059712318771975

Full Review

Contents

1. Introduction

(pp. 1–6)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.01

2. The Theory of Regal and Kungic Cultures

(pp. 7–26)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.02

3. Contributions from Other Theories

(pp. 27–64)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.03

4. Different Kinds of War in Human History

(pp. 65–92)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.04

5. Economic Determinants of Conflict and Fear

(pp. 93–124)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.05

6. Strategic Uses of Fear

(pp. 125–162)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.06

7. Regality Theory Applied to Ancient Cultures

(pp. 163–226)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.07

8. Statistical Testing of Regality Theory

(pp. 227–270)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.08

9. Discussion and Conclusion

(pp. 271–292)
  • Agner Fog
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0128.09