Tyneside Neighbourhoods: Deprivation, Social Life and Social Behaviour in One British City - cover image

Copyright

Daniel Nettle

Published On

2015-12-15

ISBN

Paperback978-1-78374-188-5
Hardback978-1-78374-189-2
PDF978-1-78374-190-8
HTML978-1-80064-504-2
XML978-1-78374-636-1
EPUB978-1-78374-191-5
MOBI978-1-78374-192-2

Language

  • English

Print Length

146 pages (viii + 138)

Dimensions

Paperback156 x 8 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.32" x 9.21")
Hardback156 x 10 x 234 mm(6.14" x 0.38" x 9.21")

Weight

Paperback482g (17.00oz)
Hardback855g (30.16oz)

Media

Illustrations30
Tables1

OCLC Number

934279169

LCCN

2019467882

BIC

  • KCR
  • KCP
  • JHBC
  • JHBL

BISAC

  • SOC045000
  • SOC053000
  • SOC050000
  • POL024000
  • POL029000

LCC

  • HM821

Keywords

  • Ethnography
  • comparative study
  • social behaviour
  • United Kingdom
  • economic deprivation
  • social solidarity
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Tyneside Neighbourhoods

Deprivation, Social Life and Social Behaviour in One British City

  • Daniel Nettle (author)
Nettle’s book presents the results of five years of comparative ethnographic fieldwork in two different neighbourhoods of the same British city, Newcastle upon Tyne. The neighbourhoods are only a few kilometres apart, yet whilst one is relatively affluent, the other is amongst the most economically deprived in the UK. Tyneside Neighbourhoods uses multiple research methods to explore social relationships and social behaviour, attempting to understand whether the experience of deprivation fosters social solidarity, or undermines it. The book is distinctive in its development of novel quantitative methods for ethnography: systematic social observation, economic games, household surveys, crime statistics, and field experiments. Nettle analyses these findings in the context of the cultural, psychological and economic consequences of economic deprivation, and of the ethical difficulties of representing a deprived community. In so doing the book sheds light on one of the main issues of our time: the roles of culture and of socioeconomic factors in determining patterns of human social behaviour.
Tyneside Neighbourhoods is a must read for scholars, students, individual readers, charities and government departments seeking insight into the social consequences of deprivation and inequality in the West.
Nettle’s book presents the results of five years of comparative ethnographic fieldwork in two different neighbourhoods of the same British city, Newcastle upon Tyne. The neighbourhoods are only a few kilometres apart, yet whilst one is relatively affluent, the other is amongst the most economically deprived in the UK. Tyneside Neighbourhoods uses multiple research methods to explore social relationships and social behaviour, attempting to understand whether the experience of deprivation fosters social solidarity, or undermines it. The book is distinctive in its development of novel quantitative methods for ethnography: systematic social observation, economic games, household surveys, crime statistics, and field experiments. Nettle analyses these findings in the context of the cultural, psychological and economic consequences of economic deprivation, and of the ethical difficulties of representing a deprived community. In so doing the book sheds light on one of the main issues of our time: the roles of culture and of socioeconomic factors in determining patterns of human social behaviour. Tyneside Neighbourhoods is a must read for scholars, students, individual readers, charities and government departments seeking insight into the social consequences of deprivation and inequality in the West.

Endorsements

This book is one of the best things I have read in a long time: erudite, thought-provoking, and very well-presented. I do applaud the openness to discussion and argument that characterises it: interdisciplinary work needs to take this form if it is to go beyond turf wars that fail to transcend familiar established positions.

Graham Crow

Professor of Sociology, University of Edinburgh

Contents

1. Introduction

(pp. 1–22)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.01

2. Study sites and methods

(pp. 23–44)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.02

3. Mutual aid

(pp. 45–64)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.03

4. Crime and punishment

(pp. 65–82)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.04

5. From cradle to grave

(pp. 83–94)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.05

6. Being there

(pp. 95–110)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.06

7. Conclusions and reflections

(pp. 111–124)
  • Daniel Nettle
https://doi.org/10.11647/obp.0084.07

Contributors

Daniel Nettle

(author)
Professor of Behavioural Science at Newcastle University