Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North

Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North Joachim Otto Habeck (ed.)
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This book draws on a wide range of theoretical perspectives – from Chaney and Bourdieu to Berger, Sontag and Bakhtin and from ideas about nostalgia to theories of consumption, nation, and ethnicity. The ethnographic detail in each chapter is impressive, and in my view is the real core of the book. It is a resource which will be widely used by Russian, Soviet and postsocialist specialists, by anthropologists, sociologists and geographers, and by anyone interested in cultural studies, material culture and consumption, and place and ethnicity.
—Dr. Frances Pine, Goldsmiths, University of London

Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North breaks new ground by exploring the concept of lifestyle from a distinctly anthropological perspective. Showcasing the collective work of ten experienced scholars in the field, the book goes beyond concepts of tradition that have often been the focus of previous research, to explain how political, economic and technological changes in Russia have created a wide range of new possibilities and constraints in the pursuit of different ways of life.

Each contribution is drawn from meticulous first-hand field research, and the authors engage with theoretical questions such as whether and how the concept of lifestyle can be extended beyond its conventionally urban, Euro-American context and employed in a markedly different setting. Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North builds on the contributors’ clear commitment to diversifying the field and providing a novel and intimate insight into this vast and dynamic region.

This book provides inspiring reading for students and teachers of Anthropology, Sociology and Cultural Studies and for anyone interested in Russia and its regions. By providing ethnographic case studies, it is also a useful basis for teaching anthropological methods and concepts, both at graduate and undergraduate level. Rigorous and innovative, it marks an important contribution to the study of Siberia and the Russian North.



Lifestyle in Siberia and the Russian North
Edited by Joachim Otto Habeck | November 2019
488 pp. | 52 color illustrations | 6.14" x 9.21" (234 x 156 mm)
ISBN Paperback: 978-1-78374-717-7
ISBN Hardback: 978-1-78374-718-4
ISBN Digital (PDF): 978-1-78374-719-1
ISBN Digital ebook (epub): 978-1-78374-720-7
ISBN Digital ebook (mobi): 978-1-78374-721-4
ISBN XML: 978-1-78374-722-1
DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0171
Subject codes: BIC: J (Society and social sciences), JH (Sociology and anthropology), JHMC (Social and cultural anthropology, ethnography), JFC (Cultural studies), 1DVUA (Russia); BISAC: SOC000000 (SOCIAL SCIENCE / General), SOC002000 (SOCIAL SCIENCE / Anthropology / General), SOC002010 (SOCIAL SCIENCE / Anthropology / Cultural & Social)


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Note on transliteration
Notes on Contributors

Preface

  1. Introduction: Studying Lifestyle in Russia
    Joachim Otto Habeck
  2. Implications of Infrastructure and Technological Change for Lifestyles in Siberia
    Dennis Zuev and Joachim Otto Habeck
  3. Lifestyle and Creative Engagement with Rural Space in Northwest Russia
    Masha Shaw (née Maria Nakhshina)
  4. Holiday Convergences, Holiday Divergences: Siberian Leisure Mobilities Under Late Socialism and After
    Luděk Brož and Joachim Otto Habeck
  5. Spatial imaginaries and personal topographies in Siberian life stories: analysing movement and place in biographical narratives
    Joseph J. Long
  6. Something like Happiness: Home Photography in the Inquiry of Lifestyles
    Jaroslava Panáková
  7. Soviet Kul’tura in Post-Soviet Identification: The Aesthetics of Ethnicity in Sakha (Yakutia)
    Eleanor Peers
  8. Ethnicity on the Move: National-Cultural Organisations in Siberia
    Artem Rabogoshvili
  9. "We are not Playing Life, We Live Here”: Playful Appropriation of Ancestral Memory in a Youth Camp in Western Siberia
    Ina Schröder
  10. A Taste for Play: Lifestyle and Live-Action Role-playing in Siberia and the Russian Far East
    Tatiana Barchunova and Joachim Otto Habeck
Conclusions
Joachim Otto Habeck

Appendix: On Research Design and Methods
Joachim Otto Habeck and Jaroslava Panáková

List of Illustrations
Index
Tatiana Barchunova is a lecturer at the Philosophical Faculty of Novosibirsk State University, Russia. She worked as a Research Affiliate at the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology from 2008 to 2013. She has published widely on gender, religion, and live-action role-play in Russian and English. She recently translated Raewyn Connell’s Gender and Power into Russian, (Gender i vlast’, 2015).

Luděk Brož is a researcher at the Institute of Ethnology, The Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic. He was Research Associate at the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, from 2008 to 2010. With Joachim Otto Habeck, he co-edited a theme section on mobility in the Far North in the journal Mobilities, vol. 10 (4), published in 2015. With Daniel Münster, he co-edited Suicide and Agency: Anthropological Perspectives on Self-Destruction, Personhood and Power (2015).

Joachim Otto Habeck teaches Anthropology at the University of Hamburg, Germany. From 2003 to 2013 he was Coordinator of the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology. He received his doctorate from the University of Cambridge in 2004. He is author of What It Means to Be a Herdsman: The Practice and Image of Reindeer Husbandry among the Komi of Northern Russia (2005) and Das Kulturhaus in Russland (2014). With Brian Donahoe, he co-edited Reconstructing the House of Culture (2011). His sphere of interest comprises popular culture, practices of distinction, and the concept of lifestyle in postsocialist countries.

Joseph J. Long is Research Manager for Scottish Autism. He is also Honorary Research Fellow in Anthropology at the University of Aberdeen and an associate of the Edinburgh Centre for Medical Anthropology. From 2010 to 2013, he was Research Fellow in the Siberian Studies Centre at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology. He has undertaken long-term fieldwork in Buryat communities in the Baikal region of Siberia where his research interests include ritual and performance practices, kinship, civic cultural institutions, and the politics of indigeneity. He received his doctorate from the University of Aberdeen in 2010.

Masha Shaw (née Maria Nakhshina) is a Researcher Development Adviser at the Postgraduate Research School, University of Aberdeen. She holds a doctorate in anthropology from the University of Aberdeen (2011), was a Research Associate in the Siberian Studies Centre at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology (2010-2013) and undertook a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Aberdeen (2013-2016). She has conducted long-term research in rural areas along the White Sea coast in the northwest of Russia. Her research interests include small-scale fisheries, fishing collective farms, perception of space and place, Pomory identity, the politics of ethnicity, and resource governance in post-Soviet Russia.

Jaroslava Panáková is a research fellow at the Institute of Ethnology and Social Anthropology, Slovak Academy of Sciences; and teacher at the Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia. She received her doctorate from the Saint Petersburg State University and was Research Associate at the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology from 2008 to 2011. Jaroslava has conducted her field research on northern peoples in Saint Petersburg and in Chukotka, looking comparatively at mobility, identity, and visual representations. Since her research stay at the CNRS in Paris from 2014 to 2015, she has attempted to link the themes of death and visuality of commemoration.

Eleanor Peers is the Arctic Information Specialist at the library of the Scott Polar Research Institute at Cambridge. She holds a doctorate in sociology from the University of Cambridge (2010), was Research Associate at the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology (2010-2013), and undertook a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Aberdeen (2015-2017). Eleanor has conducted fieldwork in Buryatia and the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and has published on post-Soviet popular culture, ethnic revival in Siberia, and post-Soviet shamanism.

Artem Rabogoshvili works as senior agent at the Bashkortostan Investment Promotion Agency (Ufa, Russia). He was member of the Siberian Studies Centre of the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, from 2010 to 2013. His publications in Russian, English, and Chinese cover the topics of migration, ethnicity, nationality politics, and social and religious movements.

Ina Schröder is associate researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology. She has conducted field research in western Siberia for her doctorate on indigeneity, gender, and the importance of youth camps for ethnic revivalism (2017). Her dissertation is entitled "Shaping Youth: quest for moral education in an indigenous community in western Siberia” and was defended at Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg in 2017.

Dennis Zuev is Research Fellow in the Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology (CIES-ISCTE-IUL) in Lisbon, Portugal. He also works as Research Associate on a project on Low-Carbon Mobilities in China at the University of Lancaster. With Regev Nathansohn, he co-edited the volume Sociology of the Visual Sphere (2013).

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