Text and Genre in Reconstruction: Effects of Digitalization on Ideas, Behaviours, Products and Institutions

Text and Genre in Reconstruction: Effects of Digitalization on Ideas, Behaviours, Products and Institutions Willard McCarty (ed.)
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-906924-24-9 £15.95
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-906924-25-6 £29.95
PDF ISBN: 978-1-906924-26-3 £0.00

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In this broad-reaching, multi-disciplinary collection, leading scholars investigate how the digital medium has altered the way we read and write text. In doing so, it challenges the very notion of scholarship as it has traditionally been imagined. Incorporating scientific, socio-historical, materialist and theoretical approaches, this rich body of work explores topics ranging from how computers have affected our relationship to language, whether the book has become an obsolete object, the nature of online journalism, and the psychology of authorship. The essays offer a significant contribution to the growing debate on how digitization is shaping our collective identity, for better or worse.

Text and Genre in Reconstruction will appeal to students and scholars in both the humanities and sciences and provides essential reading for anyone interested in the changing relationship between reader and text in the digital age.


Text and Genre in Reconstruction: Effects of Digitalization on Ideas, Behaviours, Products and Institutions
Willard McCarty (ed.) | July 2010
x + 243 | 6.14" x 9.21" (234 x 156 mm)
Digital Humanities Series, vol. 1 | ISSN: 2054-2410 (Print); 2054-2429 (Online)
ISBN Paperback: 9781906924249
ISBN Hardback: 9781906924256
ISBN Digital (PDF): 9781906924263
DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0008
BIC subject codes: H (Humanities), U (Computing and information technology), D (Literature and literary studies), UBJ (Ethical and social aspects of internet technology), CF (Linguistics)


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Introduction
Willard McCarty

1. Never Say Always Again: Reflections on the Numbers Game
John Burrows

2. Cybertextuality by the Numbers
Ian Lancashire

3. Textual Pathology
Peter Garrard

4. The Human Presence in Digital Artefacts
Alan Galey

5. Defining Electronic Editions: A Historical and Functional Perspective
Edward Vanhoutte

6. Electronic Editions for Everyone
Peter Robinson

7. How Literary Works Exist: Implied, Represented, and Interpreted
Peter Shillingsburg

8. Text as Algorithm and as Process
Paul Eggert

9. ‘I Read the News Today, Oh Boy!’: Newspaper Publishing in the Online World
Marilyn Deegan and Kathryn Sutherland

References
Willard McCarty is Professor of Humanities Computing and an academic staff member of the Centre for Language, Discourse and Communication, King’s College London, as well as Editor of Humanist and Interdisciplinary Science Reviews. He is recipient of the 2006 Richard W. Lyman Award, National Humanities Center and the Rockefeller Foundation, and of the 2005 Award for Outstanding Achievement, Computing in the Arts and Humanities, The Society for Digital Humanities, Canada.