Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice

Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice Constantine Sandis (ed.)
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Listen to editor Constantine Sandis speak about "Who Owns Culture?" on BBC Radio 4's The Moral Maze!

Sandis's gathering of thirteen thoughtful contributions across a range of disciplines vindicates his decision to consider the puzzles of cultural heritage ethics in both theoretical and practical terms . . . This rich collection of essays includes voices from the developing as well as the developed world.
— Ivan Gaskell, The Philosophical Quarterly, January 2015

This volume of edited essays on cultural heritage ethics makes for a dense yet enlightening reading experience . . . it brings to the table very interesting debates that I am sure will be further discussed in specialised forums. This short book has profusely illustrated chapters with black and white and colour pictures that serve as a visual companion to particular essays.
— Marc Balcells, Journal of Art Crime, June 2015

Theory without practice is empty, practice without theory is blind, to adapt a phrase from Immanuel Kant. The sentiment could not be truer of cultural heritage ethics. This intra-disciplinary book bridges the gap between theory and practice by bringing together a stellar cast of academics, activists, consultants, journalists, lawyers, and museum practitioners, each contributing their own expertise to the wider debate of what cultural heritage means in the twenty-first century.

Cultural Heritage Ethics provides cutting-edge arguments built on case studies of cultural heritage and its management in a range of geographical and cultural contexts. Moreover, the volume feels the pulse of the debate on heritage ethics by discussing timely issues such as access, acquisition, archaeological practice, curatorship, education, ethnology, historiography, integrity, legislation, memory, museum management, ownership, preservation, protection, public trust, restitution, human rights, stewardship, and tourism.

This volume is neither a textbook nor a manifesto for any particular approach to heritage ethics, but a snapshot of different positions and approaches that will inspire both thought and action.
Cultural Heritage Ethics provides invaluable reading for students and teachers of philosophy of archaeology, history and moral philosophy – and for anyone interested in the theory and practice of cultural preservation.




Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice
Constantine Sandis (ed.) | October 2014
xx + 208 | 51 colour illustrations | 6.14" x 9.21" (234 x 156 mm)
ISBN Paperback: 9781783740673
ISBN Hardback: 9781783740680
ISBN Digital (PDF): 9781783740697
ISBN Digital ebook (epub): 9781783740703
ISBN Digital ebook (mobi): 9781783740710
DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0047
BIC subject codes: JFC (Cultural studies), HBTB (Social and cultural history), GM (Museology and heritage studies)



Notes on Contributors
List of Illustrations
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction

I. Meaning and Memory
1. Culture, Heritage, and Ethics, Constantine Sandis
2. Poppy Politics: Remembrance of Things Present, James Fox
3. The Meaning of the Public in an Age of Privatisation, Benjamin Ramm

II. History and Archaeology
4. History as Heritage: Producing the Present in Post-War Sri Lanka, Nira Wickramasinghe
5. Looking at the Acropolis of Athens from Modern Times to Antiquity, William St Clair
6. South Asian Heritage and Archaeological Practices, Sudeshna Guha
7. The Ethics of Digging, Geoffrey Scarre

III. Ownership and Restitution
8. 'National' Heritage and Scholarship, Sir John Boardman
9. Fear of Cultural Objects, Tom Flynn
10. Restitution, Sir Mark Jones

IV. Management and Protection

11. The Possibilities and Perils of Heritage Management, Michael F. Brown
12. Values in World Heritage Sites, Geoffrey Belcher
13. Safeguarding Heritage: From Legal Rights over Objects to Legal Rights for Individuals and Communities?, Marie Cornu

Appendix: Links to Selected International Charters and Conventions on Cultural Heritage


Geoffrey Belcher was formerly Coordinator for the UNESCO Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site. He is a member of the RTPI and a RIBA Awarded Conservation Architect.

Sir John Boardman is Professor Emeritus of Classical Art and Archaeology at Oxford. He has excavated in Turkey, Greece and Libya, and published books on Greek art, classical gems and the Greeks in Asia. These include The Greeks Overseas (1964; 4th ed. 1999), Excavations at Emporio, Chios (1964), Archaic Greek Gems (1968), Greek Burial Customs (1971), Greek Gems and Finger Rings (1970, new ed. 2001), Persia and the West (2000), The History of Greek Vases (2001), The Archaeology of Nostalgia (2002), Greece and the Hellenistic World (2002), The World of Ancient Art (2006), The Marlborough Gems (2009), and The Relief Plaques of Central Asia and China (2010).

Michael F. Brown is President of the School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, and Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, USA. His books include Who Owns Native Culture? (2003), and Upriver: The Turbulent Life and Times of an Amazonian People (2014).

Marie Cornu is Research Director at the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and director of the CECOJI (Research Centre on the International Legal Cooperation), University of Poitiers. Her research interests focus on cultural property law and art law. In cooperation with Prof. Jérôme Fromageau, she co-leads an international research group that recently published a comparative dictionary on cultural property law.

Tom Flynn is founder of The Sculpture Agency and a visiting lecturer at Kingston University. He has written for The Art Newspaper, Art & Auction, Art Review, Apollo, Art News, Museums Journal, The Spectator, and many others. His books include The Body in Sculpture (1998); Colonialism and the Object: Empire, Material Culture and the Museum (1998, co-ed. with T. Barringer), The Paintings of Clive Head (2000), Jedd Novatt (2008), Sean Henry (2009), Skate's Art Investment Handbook, 2nd ed. (2010), and The Sculpture of Terence Coventry (2012).

James Fox is a Research Fellow in Art History at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge. He has previously held research positions at Harvard, Churchill College, Cambridge, and the Yale Center for British Art. He is currently preparing a monograph on British art during the First World War.

Sudeshna Guha is at present Associate Researcher at Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (FAMES), and Centre of South Asian Studies, Cambridge (UK). She researches on the history of archaeology and South Asia and has recently submitted for publication her first monograph, Artefacts of History: Archaeology, Historiography and Indian Pasts.

Sir Mark Jones is currently Master of St Cross College, Oxford. He was a curator in the British Museum for seventeen years before becoming Director first of the National Museums of Scotland and then of the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Benjamin Ramm is a writer and broadcaster, and Research Fellow at Gladstone's Library, Wales. He is the former editor of The Liberal magazine, and author of Citizens: A Manifesto.

Constantine Sandis Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hertfordshire, Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, and an intenrational collaborator of the Centre de Recherche en Éthique (CRÉ) in Montréal. He is the author of The Things We Do and Why We Do Them (2012) and has edited numerous books on the philosophy of action and human nature.

Geoffrey Scarre is Professor of Philosophy at Durham University, UK and founder and director of the Durham University Centre for the Ethics of Cultural Heritage. His books include Death (2007), Mill’s ‘On Liberty’: A Reader’s Guide (2007) and On Courage (2010); he has also edited (with Chris Scarre) The Ethics of Archaeology (2006) and (with Robin Coningham) Appropriating the Past (2013).

William St Clair is a Fellow of the British Academy and Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. His books include Lord Elgin and the Marbles (1967; 3rd rev. ed. 1998), That Greece Might Still Be Free (1972, 2nd rev. ed. 2008), Trelawny, the Incurable Romancer (1977), The Godwins and the Shelleys (1989), The Reading Nation in the Romantic Period (2004), and The Grand Slave Emporium (2006).

Nira Wickramasinghe is Professor of Modern South Asian Studies at Leiden University and the author and editor of numerous books including Dressing the Colonised Body: Politics, Clothing and Ethnic Politics in Colonial Sri Lanka 1927-1947 (1995), Civil Society in Sri Lanka. New Circles of Power (2001), History Writing: New Trends and Methodologies (2001), Identity in Colonial Sri Lanka (2003), Sri Lanka in the Modern Age - A History of Contested Identities (2006), and Metallic Modern - Everyday Machines in colonial Sri Lanka (2014).


Please find embedded below an image from the GettyImages archive, referenced in chapter 1, Constantine Sandis, Culture, Heritage, and Ethics.



This undated photo made available by Polish artist Jerzy Bohdan Szumczyk on October 16, 2016 show the sculpture he made featuring a Soviet soldier raping a pregnant woman in Gdansk, Poland. The life-size sculpture was installed without authorization in the night from Saturday to Sunday near a monument dedicated to the Red Army and was removed by the police within a few hours.
Credit JERZY BOHDAN SZUMCZYK/AFP/Getty Images.

This volume of edited essays on cultural heritage ethics makes for a dense yet enlightening reading experience . . . it brings to the table very interesting debates that I am sure will be further discussed in specialised forums. This short book has profusely illustrated chapters with black and white and colour pictures that serve as a visual companion to particular essays.
— Marc Balcells, Journal of Art Crime, June 2015

Sandis's gathering of thirteen thoughtful contributions across a range of disciplines vindicates his decision to consider the puzzles of cultural heritage ethics in both theoretical and practical terms . . . This rich collection of essays includes voices from the developing as well as the developed world.
— Ivan Gaskell, Review of 'Cultural Heritage Ethics: Between Theory and Practice', The Philosophical Quarterly, January 2015