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Editions Followed and Abbreviations

A. Dante

Unless otherwise stated, the editions of Dante’s works may be found in: Le Opere di Dante, ed. by F. Brambilla Ageno, G. Contini, D. De Robertis, G. Gorni, F. Mazzoni, R. Migliorini Fissi, P. V. Mengaldo, G. Petrocchi, E. Pistelli, P. Shaw, and rev. by D. De Robertis and G. Breschi (Florence: Polistampa, 2012).

A.1. Vernacular works

Inf.

Inferno

Purg.

Purgatorio

Par.

Paradiso

Conv.

Convivio

VN.

Vita nova

Rime.

Rime

A.3. Latin works

DVE.

De vulgari eloquentia

Mon.

Monarchia

Questio.

Questio de aqua et terra

Epist.

Epistole

Ecl.

Egloge

E. English Translations

Unless otherwise stated, the translations of Dante are adapted from these readily available and literally translated English editions:

E.1. Vernacular works

The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, ed. and trans. by Robert M. Durling; introduction and notes by Ronald L. Martinez and Robert M. Durling, 3 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996-2011).

The Banquet, trans. with introduction and notes by Christopher Ryan (Saratoga, CA: Amma Libri, 1989).

La Vita Nuova, trans. by Mark Musa (Bloomington, IN and London: Indiana University Press, 1962).

Dante’s Lyric Poetry, trans. by Kenelm Foster and Patrick Boyde, 2 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1967).

E.2. Latin works

De vulgari eloquentia, ed. and trans. by Steven Botterill (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

Monarchy, ed. and trans. by Prue Shaw. Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

The Letters of Dante, trans. by Paget J. Toynbee, 2nd edn (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1966); for the political epistles, however, Dante Alighieri: Four Political Letters, trans. by Claire Honess (London: Modern Humanities Research Association, 2007).

Dante and Giovanni del Virgilio, trans. by Philip H. Wicksteed and Edmund G. Gardner (New York: Haskell House Publishers, 1970).

In most instances, the translation [in square brackets] follows the original passage. Where the sense of the original passage is clear from the main text, the original passage (in parentheses) follows the paraphrase. Discussion is always with regard to the passage in the original.