The Scientific Revolution Revisited

The Scientific Revolution Revisited Mikuláš Teich
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-78374-122-9 £16.95
Hardback ISBN: 978-1-78374-123-6 £29.95
PDF ISBN: 978-1-78374-124-3 £5.95
epub ISBN: 978-1-78374-125-0 £5.95
mobi ISBN: 978-1-78374-126-7 £5.95

Click here to read the PDF online for free Click here to read the HTML online for free

Mikuláš Teich's new book draws on 60 years of scholarship. In it he develops an original thesis that the scientific revolution is both a factor in and a product of wide-ranging societal transformation. [...] The scientific revolution is a part of our common heritage. Understanding how it came about and continues to unfold should be part of the professional formation of every scientist, engineer and educationist.

—Ian Benson, EducationEye, Spring 2016, https://library.prospect.org.uk/id/2016/April/12/EducationEye-Spring-2016

The writer offers a principled interpretation of what influenced the completion of the Scientific Revolution. As everything has a history, so does science. Teich employs the classical chronological method, and presents each chapter, theme or concept in historical context. First, he points to the roots of the Scientific Revolution in classical times. Then follow the milestones in the history of the Scientific Revolution... Teich’s book appeals because the style of writing is direct and simple. Moreover, it invites the reader to consider themes necessary for the understanding of the Scientific Revolution.
—Antonie Doležalová, Lidové Noviny

The Scientific Revolution Revisited brings Mikuláš Teich back to the great movement of thought and action that transformed European science and society in the seventeenth century. Drawing on a lifetime of scholarly experience in six penetrating chapters, Teich examines the ways of investigating and understanding nature that matured during the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance, charting their progress towards science as we now know it and insisting on the essential interpenetration of such inquiry with its changing social environment. The Scientific Revolution was marked by the global expansion of trade by European powers and by interstate rivalries for a stake in the developing world market, in which advanced medieval China, remarkably, did not participate. It is in the wake of these happenings, in Teich's original retelling, that the Thirty Years War and the Scientific Revolution emerge as products of and factors in an uneven transition in European and world history: from natural philosophy to modern science, feudalism to capitalism, the late medieval to the early modern period.

With a narrative that moves from pre-classical thought to the European institutionalisation of science – and a scope that embraces figures both lionised and neglected, such as Nicole Oresme, Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, Isaac Newton, René Descartes, Thaddeus Hagecius, Johann Joachim Becher – The Scientific Revolution Revisited illuminates the social and intellectual sea changes that shaped the modern world.



The Scientific Revolution Revisited
Mikuláš Teich | December 2012
x + 146 | 15 colour illustrations | 6.14" x 9.21" (234 x 156 mm)
ISBN Paperback: 9781783741229
ISBN Hardback: 9781783741236
ISBN Digital (PDF): 9781783741243
ISBN Digital ebook (epub): 9781783741250
ISBN Digital ebook (mobi): 9781783741267
DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0054
BIC subject codes: PDX (History of Science), HBTB (Social and cultural history), HBJDC (European history)


Note on Terminology and Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction

1  From Pre-classical to Classical Pursuits
2  Experimentation and Quantification
3  Institutionalisation of Science
4  Truth(s)
5  The Scientific Revolution: The Big Picture
6  West and East European Contexts

Epilogue
References
Index

The co-editor of Revolution in History (1986), The Renaissance in National Context (1992), The Scientific Revolution in National Context (1992), and Nature and Society in Historical Context (1997), Mikuláš Teich is Emeritus Fellow of Robinson College, Cambridge and Honorary Professor at the Technical University of Vienna.