Cicero, Against Verres, 2.1.53–86. Latin Text with Introduction, Study Questions, Commentary and English Translation

Cicero, Against Verres, 2.1.53–86. Latin Text with Introduction, Study Questions, Commentary and English Translation Author: Ingo Gildenhard
Click here to read this book online for free (Requires Flash -- click here to read on HTML)

Everything about this book makes it immediately and brilliantly valuable and exciting for the student of Latin and Cicero, and teachers of A Level Latin have much reason to thank Professor Gildenhard.

— Stephen Jenkin, The Classics Library

Looting, despoiling temples, attempted rape and judicial murder: these are just some of the themes of this classic piece of writing by one of the world’s greatest orators. This particular passage is from the second book of Cicero’s Speeches against Verres, who was a former Roman magistrate on trial for serious misconduct. Cicero presents the lurid details of Verres’ alleged crimes in exquisite and sophisticated prose.

This volume provides a portion of the original text of Cicero’s speech in Latin, a detailed commentary, study aids, and a translation. As a literary artefact, the speech gives us insight into how the supreme master of Latin eloquence developed what we would now call rhetorical "spin”. As an historical document, it provides a window into the dark underbelly of Rome’s imperial expansion and exploitation of the Near East.

Ingo Gildenhard’s illuminating commentary on this A-Level set text will be of particular interest to students of Latin at both high school and undergraduate level. It will also be a valuable resource to Latin teachers and to anyone interested in Cicero, language and rhetoric, and the legal culture of Ancient Rome.

This book has been featured on a number of websites and blogs including The Stoa Consortium, the Association for Latin Teaching (ARLT), Joint Association of Classical Teachers (JACT) and The Classics Library.

Note from the author:
I welcome feedback on this edition, critical and otherwise, as well as suggestions of what further supplementary material or digital resources could be made available on this website. Please leave your comments in the comment tab on this site, or email me directly at ig297@cam.ac.uk.

Since publication this book has been viewed over 31.200 times (last updated June 2014).
 
This volume is part of the Classics Textbooks series:
ISSN: 2054-2437 (Print)
ISSN: 2054-2445 (Online)

Title: Cicero, Against Verres, 2.1.53–86. Latin Text with Introduction, Study Questions, Commentary and English Translation
Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero
Editor and Translator: Gildenhard, Ingo
Publication date: November 2011
Number of pages: xiv + 191
Dimensions: 6.14” x 9.21” | 234mm x 156mm
BIC Subject Codes: HBLA1 (Classical civilization), CFP (translation), 4KL (A-Levels aid)
Maps: 1 black and white
ISBN Hardback: 978-1-906924-54-6
ISBN Paperback: 978-1-906924-53-9
ISBN Digital (PDF): 978-1-906924-55-3
ISBN ebook (epub): 978-1-906924-63-8
ISBN ebook (mobi): 978-1-906924-64-5
DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0016

Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction
Latin text and study questions
Commentary
List of abbreviations
List of rhetorical terms
Translation
Appendix: issues for further discussion
Map

Ingo Gildenhard
 is Lecturer in the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge University, and a Fellow of King’s College Cambridge. His previous publications include the monographs Paideia Romana: Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations (Cambridge, 2007) and Creative Eloquence: The Construction of Reality in Cicero’s Speeches (Oxford, 2011). He has also published another textbook with Open Book Publishers, Virgil, Aeneid, 4.1-299.

Google Map of significant places
The author has created this map of the significant places mentioned in the book.
The Classics Library has created an interactive edition of the entire work. This edition is made free to read by all, while members of the Classics Library (membership is free but restricted to secondary an tertiary teachers in Latin and classics) are able to comment on, extend and ask questions on every aspect of the text. Of course, if you are not eligible to become a member of the Classics Library your comments and questiones are still very welcome and can be made in the comments section of this site.  
Click here to view the Classics Library edition.

Additional Open Access editions of the Latin Text
The Latin Text of Cicero, in Verrem 2.1, can also be found online at:

The Latin Library
This is a plain text version, without an indication of the edition used.
This is W. Peterson’s 1917 Oxford Classical Text version, hyperlinked to Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary.

Note from the author:
I welcome feedback on this edition, critical and otherwise, as well as suggestions of what further supplementary material or digital resources could be made available on this website. Please leave your comments in the comment tab on this site, or email me directly at ig297@cam.ac.uk.

Everything about this book makes it immediately and brilliantly valuable and exciting for the student of Latin and Cicero, and teachers of A Level Latin have much reason to thank Professor Gildenhard. ... Every student will certainly find this particular translation very useful indeed for a good understanding of the text. In fact Gildenhard’s clarity, detail without distraction, and reassuringly confident and comfortable style are ideal. All aspects of the work are very approachable, and will work well for an independent student or as a class textbook ... Much more of all of this, I say.
— Stephen Jenkin, The Classics Library
You can read the full review here.

See also Benjamín García-Hernández, Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 28 May 2012. http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2012/2012-05-28.html